Google Search Algorithm & Ranking Update : October 7th – 9th

Looks like we had a Google algorithm update over the weekend, starting probably late Friday, October 6th and rolling out over the weekend. Most took notice on Saturday October 7th but the chatter is still fairly strong and will likely remain strong for the net couple of days.

The ongoing WebmasterWorld thread has a lot of weekend chatter around Google ranking shuffles and changes. Here are some of those comments from the thread:

I am seeing our site appear number 1 then number 2 then number 3 or 4 in incognito. Google is now shuffling the serps!

I am seeing now some massive changes on search the Friday 13th update may have been brought forward…. if I’m right I brag naming rights as the “Sunday B|oody Sunday Update” happy!

Huge improvments on my side. +65% comparing this sunday with last sunday.

Looks like my organic traffic is now back to normal and I’m seeing slight increase.

I don’t think we should name it the Sunday Bloody Sunday Update – since the update started before Sunday. Maybe you can call it the Columbus Weekend update since today is Columbus Day or something Fred related or we can not name it anything.

Here are the tools, almost all of them showing significant changes in Google:

Mozcast:
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Algoroo:
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SEMRush:
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Accuranker:
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SERP Metrics:
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Advanced Web Rankings:
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RankRanger:
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RankRanger is the only tool not showing changes, which is weird – maybe there is a bug with their software or maybe they see something no one else does?

In any event, I don’t see any comments from Google on this and I am honestly tired of asking Google about these updates. Maybe that will change with Danny Sullivan joining Google or maybe it won’t? We will see.

Resource URL:- https://www.seroundtable.com/google-search-algorithm-ranking-update-october-24589.html

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Google Search Ranking & Algorithm Update Underway? Chatter..

Google Algorithm Update

In the past 24 to 48 hours I have been noticing an uptick in SEO and webmaster chatter around a possible Google search algorithm and ranking update. It is not clear if it is related to specific algorithm changes or maybe changes to how things rank due to user interface changes but there are webmasters asking what is going on.

The ongoing WebmasterWorld thread has a nice amount of early chatter. I am seeing comments on my own site on the past day or so with complaints and other social media mentions.

This might be something Google reverted or is rolling out slowly, it is not clear. Of course, with any of these, without Google confirming it, we have no way to say for sure if Google did do an update. Google will just give us their typical line that they make updates all the time or say “Fred.”

Here are some of the mentions from the forum threads:

We had a horrific morning at 50% down, but it’s back to normal for the last hour

Whatever they did but today we have a drop of 50% right now with bounce at 99%.

I’m more than 50%, closer to 75%!

Seeing two sets of results. One obviously one better than the other.bad set: traffic about 5% no user action, no transactions, bounce 100% good result: normal traffic, user action, bounce at 30%, normal sales

I’m seeing a few drop in visitors on my site. Might be it has something to do with this update or else.

Virtually all the automated Google tracking tools show normal “weather” behavior and no real signs of a major update yet. Maybe they will pick up on it tomorrow or maybe like I said, it was just Google testing here and there.

I am not seeing mass complaints in the normal Google forums with specific webmasters complaining yet. I am just seeing this analysis from SEOs and Webmasters in the more Google focused forums.

Are you seeing ranking changes and traffic changes?

Resource: https://www.seroundtable.com/google-search-ranking-algorithm-update-24419.html

Google Algorithm & Ranking Update Chatter

Google Update Brewing

Starting over the weekend, mostly Saturday and Sunday on August 19th and 20th, there were some chatter in the webmaster channels around Google fluctuations in the search results. The chatter was intense for a day or so and died out a lot since then, but there was chatter.

Both WebmasterWorld and Black Hat World both had chatter around a weekend Google update. But like I said, the chatter mostly died down since, although the black hat forums are more “chatty” about it.

The threads are talking about both personal ups and downs in the Google search results and also overall lack of quality in the search results over the weekend.

Some of the tools show a spike of some sorts near the weekend, not that I fully trust the tools but it is good when measured against the chatter in the webmaster community.

Here is Mozcast:

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Here is Algoroo which is missing the 19th:

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Accuranker:

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RankRanger:

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SEMRush Sensor:

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To be 100% clear, the chatter is very limited compared to large updates but there is chatter and the tools do correlate to the chatter.

Did you notice ranking changes and traffic changes from Google since the weekend?

Resource: https://www.seroundtable.com/google-algorithm-ranking-update-24341.html

Poll: Is Black Hat SEO Dying?

There is a pretty large new thread at Black Hat World where “black hats” are discussing if their methods are dying out now. Black hat SEO is the SEO practice of going against Google’s webmaster guidelines in order to manipulate the Google search results in their own favor. These practices can include link spam, hacking into sites, hurting competitors, and many other forms of spam listed in the webmaster guidelines.

The thread was started a couple days ago and now has dozens and dozens of replies. Some believe it is way harder to do black hat SEO these days then it was years ago. Some are saying Google’s algorithms are way smarter now. Some are saying that Google acts too fast to remove their sites and the effort is not worth it. While others are saying it still works well and although it may be harder, it is still very effective if you know what you are doing.

Here are some quotes from the thread:

If it is an algorithm, it can be gamed. That should sum it up.

It’s just evolving.

Blackhat works. Yes, still it is working well. The question is, how experience you do have and how well you could implement them.

It all depends on what niche you are working on and how much you got power to dominate. It’s a game

Do you do black hat SEO? Do you know people that do? Please take our anonymous poll below and have your friends take it. I’d love to share the results in the near future.

 

Google: We Penalizes Egregious Link Manipulation; Otherwise Ignores The Link

As you know, Google treats links from spammy sites vs unnatural links differently. But Google also treats different types of unnatural links differently as well. Unnatural links that are classified as “egregious link manipulation” would likely penalize a site whereas other links that are unnatural are likely just ignored by Google.

Gary Illyes from Google said this on Twitter:

If you have a footer nav with the same links on each page, would Google view this as attempted manipulation & penalize? @methode @JohnMu

@_newsbulletin @JohnMu That depends on the purpose of that link really, but if it’s not a egregious link manipulation scheme, we’re more likely to just ignore them

Google’s new real time Penguin algorithm devalues links and no longer penalizes or demotes links – so this is a similar statement.

Source link:- https://www.seroundtable.com/google-penalizes-egregious-link-manipulation-23957.html

Emoji SEO: Can You Rank For Emoji-Based Searches?

How To Get Started With App Store SEO

If you’re a digital marketing veteran, you already know about search engine optimization (SEO) and how it can attract more traffic to your site—even if you’re not well versed in the specific tactics necessary to get there. However, most people think of SEO in only one dimension—as it applies to Google web search.

For the most part, it makes sense—Google has long been the dominant search engine in the online world, and continues to hold on to its two-thirds majority of searchers. However, if your main goal isn’t directing people to a website, it won’t be enough to help you.

For example, if your main source of revenue is a mobile app, you’ll want as many people as possible to download it—and while Google does offer some search features that allow mobile apps to show up in search engine results pages, the primary way for your app to be discovered will be through app stores, such as those offered by Apple and Google.

App store SEO is the process of making your app rank higher in search results within these app stores for relevant keyword searches, and making sure your app is considered relevant for the right searches.

As you can imagine, it’s a technical and complicated topic, but this article will introduce you to the basics of app store SEO.

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The Big Picture

Let’s start with the big picture. App optimization works very similarly to website optimization, at least from a high-level perspective. App stores want to give users the best possible results for their searches, so they want to accomplish two things:

  • Relevance. When you search for keywords like “time management” or “jogging,” app stores want to give you results that reflect those interests, and will choose apps based on how they’re described to fulfill those needs.
  • Quality. When multiple apps are available, they’ll be ranked according to not only how relevant they are, but how high-quality they appear to be.

Your job as an app optimizer is to improve your app in both these areas, making sure it’s indexed in a way that reflects its main purpose and improving stores’ perceptions of its quality. There are several tactics you can use to achieve these ends.

App Names and Categories

Though Apple and Google stores offer a different technical setup, they both work in similar ways conceptually, so I’ll treat them both the same for the purposes of this article. Your first job is going to be naming your app, as your app name will be one of the strongest signalers of its relevance; for example, if someone searches for “Uber,” that’s a pretty strong indicator they want the “Uber” app.

It may be helpful to include at least one keyword within the name of your app that’s relevant to the function of your app to capitalize on basic keyword searches. For example, a keyword-optimized name for a diet tracker app might be something like “My Diet Tracker” – while it doesn’t have catchy brand name appeal, it’s easy to remember and will instantly have a leg-up on competing apps because of its keyword relevance.

After settling on an app name, you’ll need to choose a category, which will help your app be listed and categorized appropriately. Apple has an awesome guide on this subject.

Source URL: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jaysondemers/2017/04/24/how-to-get-started-with-app-store-seo/#3e884dc51906